Right plant in the right place

Gardening Tips from Justin Green:

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The secret to successful landscape design is thorough planning. Remember that once you have a plan, you don’t have to do all the work at once, you can implement it one area at a time.

To achieve a natural, healthy balance in your landscape start with putting the right plant in the right place. This covers far more than simply putting sun-loving plants in your yard’s sunny spots. You should also consider things like maintenance and water needs.

 

One way to design your landscape is by choosing two or three colors that complement each other and repeat the color combination throughout your landscaped area, creating landscape beds that are visually attractive. Consider using Florida native plants that are most likely accustomed to our weather and soil conditions.

 

Proper irrigation is key to a luxurious landscape area. Irrigate only when plants need water or when rain has been inadequate. Try putting moisture-loving plants in moist areas and plants that prefer well-drained soil in drier areas. Deep root water whenever possible.

 

Spread mulch around shrubs and trees and in flower beds, 2 to 4 inches thick. Mulch helps hold moisture in the soil, moderate temperatures to slowly release nutrients, reduces weed growth and slows erosion. Consider mulch as an investment and spread it annually for a neater garden. Old mulch decomposes into the soil making it more fungal dominant, while building soil, adding many necessary nutrients and feeds your plants, shrubs, and trees. If you can’t pick this item up, get it delivered!

 

Fertilizing and pruning will help to maintain healthy plants. The best time of year for pruning is early spring.  Fertilizing feeds your plants many necessary nutrients to prolong the life of the plant. Remove weeds by hand, or use an herbicide. Watch for pests and make sure they’re truly a problem before waging war, then do it organically whenever possible. 

 

Visit this website for more information.

 

http://floridayards.org/fyplants/